Murder of the King

Book 2, Chapter 7, Alfred’s Children from 901 AD to 955 – Edmund

The two sons of Dunmail, who had been taken prisoners, were barbarously deprived of sight. Such cruelty, together with the amputation of limbs, the cutting out of tongues, and the cutting off of noses of captives had become common on the continent, but hitherto it had rarely disgraced the Anglo-Saxons. Edmund’s reign was prematurely cut short. He was at Puckle church in Gloucestershire, celebrating the feast of St. Augustine, when a man named Leof entered the hall and seated himself among the guests. This man had been banished the country for pillage, and on seeing him Edmund ordered him to withdraw. This he refused to do, and resisted all attempts to remove him, on which the king, who was naturally choleric, rose from his seat and seized the man by his long hair to drag him out. In the struggle, Leof stabbed Edmund with a dagger, inflicting a mortal blow, and he himself was instantly attacked and cut in pieces by the infuriated attendants. The body of the king was removed to Glastonbury Abbey for interment, of which place the head at that time was Dunstan, afterwards so celebrated in English annals. Thus terminated his brief reign of five years.


Chapter 7, Alfred’s Children

Edward Becomes King

The Succession Disputed by Ethelwald

Partial Annexation of East Anglia and Northumbria

Mercia Added

Chapter 7, Athelstan

Athelstan, the First Monarch of England

Intrigue Against Him

Conflicts with the Anglo-Danes

Formidable Invasion

Decisive Battle of Brunanburh

The Anglo-Danes Revolt, and are Subdued

Chapter 7, Renown of Athelstan

Renown of Athelstan

Death and Character

Chapter 7, Edmund

Edmund

Reign of Edmund

Murder of the King

Chapter 7, Edred

Edred Succeeds

A Strong Mind in a Frail Body

Outbreak in Northumbria

Rise of Statesmen

Dunstan and Turketul

Authorities



Categories: Book 2

1 reply

Trackbacks

  1. Murder of the King – English History | Ned Hamson's Second Line View of the News

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: