Medicine

Book 2, Chapter 6, The End of the Ninth Century – Anglo Saxon Hunting and Travelling

So early’ as the seventh century, the Anglo-Saxons had persons, who made medicine a study and profession, and it is probable, that they derived their knowledge from the Christian clergy who placed one medical brother in every monastery. Their practice, however, was often of a very barbarous and superstitious character, their remedies were generally vegetable medicines, and they were particularly observant of the days proper for bleeding, which were less than half the month.

Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, when lecturing there on medicine, remonstrated against bleeding on the fourth day of the moon, when the light of the planet and the tides of the ocean were in-creasing: and it is recorded, that a physician let his horse bleed on one of the evil days, “and it soon lay dead.” If a man died suddenly it was thought he was a bad man, and had been taken away in judgment. Barrenness, famine, and other evils were thought to be punishments for having disfigured an image of the Virgin. The appearance of a comet foretold pestilence, famine, war, or a change in the kingdom.


Chapter 6, Ancient Towns and Highways

Domestic life of the Anglo-Saxons

Houses

Buildings

Bells and Churches

Ancient Towns

Highways

Chapter 6, Internal Fittings of Houses

Tapestry

Fires

Chapter 6, Anglo-Saxon Furniture

Anglo-Saxon Furniture

Food and Drink

Amusements

Furniture and Beds

Household Economy

Treatment of Slaves

The Toilette

Costume and Ornaments

Chapter 6, Anglo Saxon Hunting and Travelling

Hunting

Travelling and Inns

Medicine

The Calendar

Chapter 6, Anglo-Saxon Language

Anglo-Saxon Language

Local and District Courts of Justice

Authorities



Categories: Book 2

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